Twelve Principles for Healthy and Sustainable Places

In support of project underway of United Nations University’s Global Health Institute

UN Urban thinkers Campus

  1. COHABIT – Design with nature. Human and ecosystem health stand centre stage in good place design. If it is good for our small planet, we are well on the way to healthy and sustainable places, and sustainable lives. Sustainability and sharing is a defining context!  It changes everything.
  1. SENSES – Humans like all animals are intimately connected to place through our senses – hearing, touch, smell, taste and sight. And a sense of compassion. Beautiful, vibrant and culturally distinct places ignite the senses, bringing a feeling of wellbeing, security, creativity and generosity of spirit.
  1. COMPLEXITY – Natural, economic and cultural diversity make for complex but equally interesting and resilient places. So forget everything you think you know. Welcome chaos and complexity as a necessary first step in the solution process. Engage with diverse ideas, cultures and approaches.
  1. OPPORTUNITY – Given the level, dynamics and sheer overwhelming complexity of the challenges, we will not solve 21st century challenges with measures based on the old paradigms. So much has changed in terms of imagination, technologies and the way we use them. So prepare to be very different.
  1. PROXIMITY – Physical activity, social connection and healthy eating are fostered through proximity, and natural and built environments that are designed to connect, respect and protect. Retire distance, speed and indifference. Replace with proximity, safety and neighborliness.
  1. EQUITY – Justice and equity are vibrant beacons for health, democracy and development in human settlements. Burdens of climate change and unsustainable development must not be carried by the most vulnerable citizens, cities and countries.
  1. DEMOCRACY – Good governance holds the key to the future of human settlements. Citizens cannot be not passive spectators. There is more to democracy than occasional elections. Mobilise civil society in all its diversity and differences around big questions and strive for local answers.
  1. PARITY – Sustainability cannot be planned, decided and administered by a minority. Daily life needs and perceptions of women differ in many ways. The only path to planning and implementing sustainable, efficient and just communities is to ensure full gender parity in all decision fora.   
  1. RESISTANCE– Most human beings are change-averse and ready to challenge anything they perceive see as invasions in any part of their daily lives. So we must anticipate this from the beginning and have a multi-level strategy which takes this into account from the beginning. 
  1. TIMEMake time our ally. We need to be very clever in the many ways that we can put it to work for our good cause. We can knit together the strands of our solution, putting time on our side 
  1. COLLABORATION By creating and pushing to their limit flat, open, citizen peer knowledge networks we enter a new age of problem solving capabilities far beyond anything available to us in the past. (Which is to say, we have a chance!) 
  1. NEVER GIVE UP

[1] Revised working draft by Eric Britton submitted in response to a request from an on-going research project of the United Nations University’s  Global Health Institute (http://iigh.unu.edu/) that is setting out Principles of Healthy and Sustainable Places. In support of their Health and Wellbeing in the City We Need symposium to meet in Kuching, Malaysia from January 24-27, 2016  –  http://unhabitat.org/urbanthinkers/ for more.

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About the author:

Eric Britton
9, rue Gabillot, 69003 Lyon France

Bio: Trained as a development economist, Eric Britton is a sustainability activist, Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Development at the Institut Supérieur de Gestion in Paris, and managing director of EcoPlan International, an independent advisory network providing strategic counsel for government and business on policy and decision issues involving complex systems, social-technical change and sustainable development. His latest work focuses on the subject of equity, economy and efficiency in city transport and public space, and helping governments to ask the right questions and find practical solutions to urging climate, mobility, life quality and job creation issues. Founding editor of World Streets and the Journal of World Transport Policy and Practice, his forthcoming book, “Contradictions: Toward a General Theory of Transport in Cities”, is being presented, discussed and critiqued in a series of international conferences, master classes, peer reviews and media events in Asia, Europe and Africa over 2016. - - > More: http://wp.me/PsKUY-2p7

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JOKING ABOUT RAPING WOMEN

rape

“Can we stop with the rape jokes already?”

– February 7, 2016.. Article in today’s The Malaysian Insider

– Full text at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/…/can-we-stop-with-the-r…

“Why does your hair look like it has been gang raped?” So asked a friend of mine as I stepped into the cool air-conditioned room after a long afternoon walk under the scorching George Town sun, my hair fried to a crispy frizz.

Rape jokes are aplenty in the world, and just like perpetrators of any acts of violence against women (VAW), those who “crack” rape jokes can be anyone – of any gender, age group, religion, class, etc.

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“Gender Mainstreaming in Rural Transport – Call for research concepts

Centrral African repulic women buidling road
The Research for Community Access Partnership would like to inform you of the following opportunity:

Call for Research concepts in “Gender Mainstreaming in Rural Transport”

Following on from the Gender Mainstreaming discussion facilitated on GATNET during November-December 2015, The Research for Community Access Partnership (ReCAP) is pleased to publish a call for research concepts from researchers and practitioners to further explore aspects that will contribute to the key research areas.
 
ReCAP is interested in supporting an understanding of Gender Mainstreaming among those within the ReCAP community and beyond who are able to influence policy and practice in Africa and Asia (particularly in ReCAP partner countries). Individuals or organisations in Africa and Asia can submit research concepts, independently or in collaboration with other individuals or organisations in Africa, Asia or the rest of the world.
 
ReCAP envisages commissioning a ‘cluster’ of several proposals, each less than GBP 50,000. However, one or more larger collaborative projects could be considered.
 
Interested organisations or individuals can request the full document by sending an e-mail to Edson.Madeira@cardno.com with copy to Rebecca.Hunt@Cardno.uk.com, stating the project reference No.GEN2044B on the e-mail subject.
 
All submissions must be received by no later than 22nd February 2016, 17:00 UK time.
Cardno Emerging Markets is an Equal Opportunity Employer and is committed to Child Protection.
For further information about the ReCAP please visit http://www.research4cap.org 
Project Management Unit – Cardno
Phone:+441844216500 Mob:+44 (0)7747271753
Email: Adrienne.Cox@cardno.uk.com
Skype: Adrienne.cox_2

Africa: Reporting Climate Change With a Gender Lens

Africa Zalingei, West Darfur - women carrying wood

From a journalism perspective there is a tendency of becoming overly technical when addressing climate changes.

A useful way of reporting on this topic is to find cases in which the effects of climate change are being directly experienced and to tell the stories of the people affected. It is important to recognise that women experience the impacts of global climate change in a different manner from men.

UN Women describes women’s vulnerability to climate change as follows: “In many of these contexts, women are more vulnerable to the effects of climate change than men – primarily as they constitute the majority of the world’s poor and are more dependent for their livelihood on natural resources that are threatened by climate change.

Furthermore, they face social, economic and political barriers that limit their coping capacity. Women and men in rural areas in developing countries are especially vulnerable when they are highly dependent on local natural resources for their livelihood.

Those charged with the responsibility to secure water, food and fuel for cooking and heating face the greatest challenges. Secondly, when coupled with unequal access to resources and to decision-making processes, limited mobility places women in rural areas in a position where they are disproportionately affected by climate change.”

Source: http://www.ifj.org/nc/news-single-view/backpid/32/article/reporting-climate-change-with-a-gender-lens/

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International Federation of Journalists (IFJ)

The IFJ and the World Association of Christian Communications published in 2012 a learning toolkit on gender ethical journalism. A whole chapter is dedicated to reporting climate change with a gender lens.

It documents specific issues journalists should bear in mind when covering climate change and provides a series of tips and  guidelines to fair gender portrayal in covering this topic.

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Saudi Historian Says U.S. Women Drive Because They Don’t Care If They’re Raped

Saudi historian - they dont care if they are raped

Click HERE for 2 minute video with captions

Dear Gatnet Friends

Before we get to the content of what the eminent Saudi Historian has to say on this relevant topic of women who want to be raped, let me take you quickly to our Gatnet 2.0 site and show you how you can put to work one of the special tools we have developed to support the collaborative work at Gatnet. Happily, these rather simple tools are also more generally to anyone anywhere who happens to share our interest in the complex topic of women, transport and equity in our oh so different societies.

The particular tool I would like to draw to your attention today is our so-call KNOOGLE (yes, an ugly word) combined search engine, to which you can go directly here – – https://gatnet.wordpress.com/links-sources-2/searching-all-links/.

Now, to show you a sample of how this works, this morning I wanted to know more about the site of the local elections in Saudi Arabia where for the first time 130,000 women registered to vote and when the ballots were counted more than a dozen  of these heroes have been elected to local office — for the first time.

So I scrolled down on the right menu here where it indicates  KNOOLGE, and popped in the single key word “Saudi” which called up a very large number of entries, with coverage of the latest developments in the voting situation right up top.  With the eminent Saudi historian’s remarks toward the end of the first page of entries.

And now if you wish, let’s take a look at that article and see if we can understand what the good gentleman has in mind:

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Woman wins seat in Saudi election

Saudi Arabia - women leaving voting area after firsst election

A Saudi woman has won a seat on Mecca’s municipal council in Saudi Arabia’s first ever elections open to female voters and candidates, the country’s election commission has announced.

Article taken with thanks to The Guardian, Sunday 13 December 2015

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